North Texas Catfish Guide Service http://www.txcatfishguide.com Catfish guide service for blue catfish, channel catfish and flathead catfish on North Texas area lakes. Mon, 22 Sep 2014 18:21:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 Texas Catfish Guide February 2014 Fishing Report http://www.txcatfishguide.com/fishing-report-february-2014/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/fishing-report-february-2014/#respond Fri, 21 Feb 2014 08:10:37 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1506 It’s been a good while since I’ve posted a fishing report. Things have been so crazy I just keep forgetting but I wanted to provide a quick update of some recent trips and results to let everyone know what is going on and how the catfishing is, some updates on the local lakes and more...

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It’s been a good while since I’ve posted a fishing report. Things have been so crazy I just keep forgetting but I wanted to provide a quick update of some recent trips and results to let everyone know what is going on and how the catfishing is, some updates on the local lakes and more North Texas Catfish Guide Service news!

Welcome “Brother Terry”

Several months ago I posted that Robert Horton had joined North Texas Catfish Guide Service and we were now running a 20′ Air Ranger air boat on the Red River and Brazos River fishing for Trophy Blue Catfish.

Terry Terry (Brother Terry) has joined the North Texas Catfish Guide Service team as well to add another boat to our fleet at Eagle Mountain Lake. Terry has been guiding on the local lakes for several years and had taken a break from guiding to focus on some other priorities.

When he decided to start guiding again I was happy to bring him on the team. I’ve been working side by side with Terry on Eagle Mountain Lake for a number of years now and speaking on a regular basis and I knew he would be a great fit for the North Texas Catfish Guide Service clients.

Terry knows the lakes and knows catfish and will continue the standard of excellence that’s been set for our Eagle Mountain Lake fishing guide service.

I’m Still Guiding, Here’s The Deal

I’ve had a number of people contact me asking if I had stopped guiding or if i was going to stop guiding.

The answer is no, I have not stopped guiding and have no plans to stop. 

Here’s the deal. I’ve been at the helm of North Texas Catfish Guide Service for nearly 15 years now and during that time I’ve always done things the same way and I’ve always had another guide to help.

That “help” I had from an additional guide became unavailable due to health issues so I’ve been left running solo for the last couple of years. I’ve also been juggling a lot of other priorities as my other fishing related ventures with Learn To Catch Catfish, Catfish Edge, hosting the Southwest Outdoors Report and now of recent writing and photography for numerous magazines I’ve become stretched pretty thin.

I’m focusing some energy on getting some other aspects of the business in order and have my hand in a lot of new things that will be announced later this year.

I’m still fishing, just not fishing so much that I kill myself and taking some time to address some of my new business ventures.

I’ll still be on the water guiding clients and although my scheduling has been a nightmare over the past few months there’s a light at the end of the tunnel and it should start getting easier soon.

Regardless of whether you’re booked with me or another of the North Texas Catfish Guide Service guides you’ll be fishing with someone that I know has the skills and abilities to put you on fish!

Just make sure that if you want to fish with me, you let us know and we’ll do everything we can to make sure you get taken care of. If you’ve fished with me before just give me a call instead of completing the booking form.

Eagle Mountain Lake Water Levels

I’ve been getting a bunch of phone calls and emails of recent wanting to know about the water levels at Eagle Mountain Lake.

The lake is very low, probably as low or lower than I have seen it in decades. If you don’t know the lake very well you need to make sure you have a good map or GPS and pay very close attention to the shallow water areas.

There are a few boat ramps open still including the Fort Worth Anglers Club, Lakeview Marina and the new Twin Points Park boat ramp. To my knowledge all of the other boat ramps are closed at this time.

Will you still be able to launch a boat at Eagle Mountain Lake?

Everyone seems to be wondering what’s going to happen this summer. I’ll tell you the same thing that I’ve been telling everyone else for the past few months. 

If we don’t get some major rain in the next two months (before mid May) then my guess is now, you will not be able to launch a boat except for at the new Twin Points Ramp and even that may be questionable. I’ve been told it will be good to a -15 foot level but have not confirmed that.

My expectation is that if we do not get some serious rain (enough to bring the lake up about six feet) then there will be nowhere to launch a boat on the lake unless the TRWD starts pumping water in fast an furious pretty soon and keeps doing so for months. In the summer the lake drops quickly and going into June with the lake as low as it is now will not be good.

Now, this is based on nobody extending boat ramps or doing something to help compensate for the low water levels.

Texas Catfish Guide Fishing Report

Water temperatures reached levels I’ve not seen in many years but the fishing has been red hot!

We’ve caught excellent numbers of Trophy Blue Catfish all winter and continue to do so and we are heading into spring which is the best blue catfish action of the year.

Long story short, if you want fast paced action and lot’s of catfish you need to get your trip booked soon for the spring blue catfish bite!

You can also view photos from the February 2014 Fishing Report here.

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I’ve Joined The Southwest Outdoors Report As Their Catfish Pro! http://www.txcatfishguide.com/southwest-outdoors-report/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/southwest-outdoors-report/#respond Fri, 21 Feb 2014 01:03:11 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1503 I mentioned several months ago I was guest hosting the Southwest Outdoors Report show on Fox Sports. Things have been so busy lately I forgot to follow up here and provide an update. You can view the entire show below and get more details here at Catfish Edge. The cat is finally out of the...

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I mentioned several months ago I was guest hosting the Southwest Outdoors Report show on Fox Sports. Things have been so busy lately I forgot to follow up here and provide an update.

You can view the entire show below and get more details here at Catfish Edge.

The cat is finally out of the bag as well so I wanted to post a quick update here. I’ve joined the Southwest Outdoors Report as their catfish pro and will be filling in for Barry Stokes on the catfish shows going forward in 2014 so you’ll be seeing much more of me in the future.

Be sure to check out the Southwest Outdoors Report website and set your DVR to record the show so you can stay on the lookout.

Better yet sign up for my mailing list so I can keep you updated on all the latest updates and information!

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Catfish Edge Trailer http://www.txcatfishguide.com/catfish-edge-trailer/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/catfish-edge-trailer/#respond Fri, 21 Feb 2014 00:51:35 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1498 I started working on a project in 2013 called Catfish Edge and have discussed it with many of my guide clients since then. It’s been a long hard road to get to this point but Catfish Edge is finally up and running. All of the details are not public yet but I recently released a...

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I started working on a project in 2013 called Catfish Edge and have discussed it with many of my guide clients since then. It’s been a long hard road to get to this point but Catfish Edge is finally up and running.

All of the details are not public yet but I recently released a video trailer that’s a good representation of Catfish Edge.

Check it out below and join me over at Catfish Edge.

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I’m Hosting The Southwest Outdoors Report This Week! http://www.txcatfishguide.com/hosting-southwest-outdoors-report/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/hosting-southwest-outdoors-report/#respond Thu, 28 Nov 2013 05:17:07 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1455 Just a quick heads up! Set your DVR to record theSouthwest Outdoors Report on Fox Sports Southwest this week! I’m hosting the entire show this week that airs on Thursday 11/28 at 10:30 PM and again on Saturday morning at 8:00 in the morning. We dodged days of foul weather, sleet, snow and rain to...

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Just a quick heads up! Set your DVR to record theSouthwest Outdoors Report on Fox Sports Southwest this week!

I’m hosting the entire show this week that airs on Thursday 11/28 at 10:30 PM and again on Saturday morning at 8:00 in the morning.

We dodged days of foul weather, sleet, snow and rain to try to shoot this show and get it on the air this week and finally found a very short window to get on the water and shoot the TV show.

I cover some tips for catching trophy blue catfish in the winter on this show, catch a nice blue catfish and have an all around good time while freezing to death in some awful weather.

Be sure to check it out! I’ll post the video here on the site after the show airs when the video is posted online.

If you don’t mind I would appreciate you taking a second to help spread the word through the links below:

Click To Tweet – Check out @CatchCatfish on the Southwest Outdoors Report 11/28 at 10:30 PM and 11/30 at 8:00 AM

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Chumming For Catfish http://www.txcatfishguide.com/chumming-catfish/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/chumming-catfish/#respond Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:31:23 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1413 We get a lot of questions on our guided catfish fishing trips with North Texas Catfish Guide Service about chumming for catfish or “baiting a catfish hole” as a lot of people like to call it and whether it is an effective way to catch catfish. Using chum, or chumming for catfish is something that...

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We get a lot of questions on our guided catfish fishing trips with North Texas Catfish Guide Service about chumming for catfish or “baiting a catfish hole” as a lot of people like to call it and whether it is an effective way to catch catfish.

Using chum, or chumming for catfish is something that we do on our North Texas Catfish Guide Service guided catfish fishing trips at times when we target channel catfish.

Channel Catfish in general are considered to be scavenger fish, and blue catfish in general are considered to be predator fish and scavenger fish. The channel catfish lives on a diet of whatever it can find to eat, and know to bite anything from a dead minnow, to a piece of bait soap or a hot dog, to homemade or commercially prepared “stink” baits or “punch” baits. The “scavenge” the bottom of the lake looking for anything and everything to eat.

While the blue catfish does spend some of its existence feeding on items like the channel catfish, and blue catfish can be caught on items like catfish bait soap and stink baits, the primary difference between the blue catfish diet is that the blue catfish primarily feeds on shad. The follow the schools of shad and bait fish all year long and forage on these fish on a regular basis. In our opinion the bigger the catfish, the more likely they are to live on a diet of live or dead bait fish and shad.

If your interested in “baiting a hole for catfish” or chumming for catfish then you need to remember a few things. When your baiting a hole for catfish, or chumming, you will primarily catch channel catfish, and most of the fish will be between one and three pounds, with a some larger catfish mixed in, depending on the lake that your fishing for catfish in.

Does this mean that if you “bait a hole for catfish” or chum that you will not catch blue catfish? NO, it does not, because there is likelihood that you will catch some blue catfish here and there when you chum, but the catfish will primarily be channel catfish and the blue catfish that you catch will typically be 1-5 pound blue catfish as well.

Does this mean that you will never catch a Trophy Catfish when fishing a baited hole or chumming an area? NO, because it does happen from time to time, but if your out to specifically target Trophy Blue Catfish like we do on our guided catfish fishing trips at North Texas Catfish Guide Service then chumming for catfish or “baiting a hole” is not the way to do so. If your primary objective is to get out and catch a lot of catfish that are “box” fish or keeper sized for a fish fry or just simply for the means of catching a lot of fish, then chumming may very well be an effective means for you to do so.

We perfectly understand on our guided catfish fishing trips with North Texas Catfish Guide Service that some people want to catch a handful of really big blue catfish, and others would prefer to catch a whole bunch or “keeper” sized fish or “box” fish.

Now, with all this in mind, let’s talk about “baiting a hole” for catfish, or chumming for catfish, how to do it, what to use, and how to fish in these areas, and explain the difference between “baiting a catfish fishing hole” and chumming.

First and foremost is the “chum” that you will use. Many catfish anglers will have different opinions on what the “best” thing to use for catfish chum is.

Many different options are available with the most common being wheat, milo, hen scratch, range cubes and cottonseed cakes.

Cottonseed cakes were the item most used for a “baiting a hole for catfish” (chumming) for many years, and then people stopped using them because lack of availability. There are very few feed mills in the United States that still manufacture cottonseed cakes, and they are very hard to come by. The feed mills have started producing a product called ranges cubes, which is a smaller version of the cottonseed cake. The range cubes are used to feed cattle and are available at any feed store. Cottonseed cake is without a doubt better than the range cubes because they contain much more oil than the range cubes do, which seems to help with attracting channel catfish, but again, being able to find the cottonseed cake will likely be extremely difficult.

If you can actually find the cottonseed cakes, they typically cost between $7 and $8 each. We typically use one entire cake in each hole we are baiting (chumming) for channel catfish when using cottonseed cakes.

Range cubes come in fifty pound bags and will cost about $5 to $6 a bag and one fifty pound bag will bait about 6-8 areas. (Typically about 1 gallon to 1.5 gallons of range cubes per hole for chumming). When purchasing range cubes you can get these at any feed store and you want to make sure that you purchase the 20% range cubes. (Just go in the feed store and ask for 20% range cubes they will know what you’re talking about.

The range cubes are beneficial for those that have weak stomachs and cannot handle the strong smells from soured grain chum, those that do not want the soured grains in their boats, and those that are fishing on short notice and do not have time to prepare soured milo or soured wheat for catfish chum.

The next option is using soured grain for catfish chum. Soured grain would encompass milo, wheat and hen scratch. Make no mistake; the chum you will make out of any of these soured grains will STINK. You need to be prepared for the smell that will arise from the fermenting grain in a few weeks, because it will be obvious, and you need to be prepared for the smell when you take the grain out on the lake to chum for catfish or bait your catfish hole. Some people simply cannot stand the smell of the soured grain.

Milo is most commonly found in Texas. I have received feedback from my clients of North Texas Catfish Guide Service on our guided catfish fishing trips that live outside of Texas that have told me that Milo is not available in their area, but it is available in many areas. Milo is also called grain sorghum in some areas.

Milo (grain sorghum) is grown in the hot dry plains of Texas where corn will not grow. Grain Sorghum is a food grain for humans, but in the United States it is primarily used as a food for livestock. The Milo (grain sorghum) is cracked or rolled and fed to livestock in place of corn.

Milo (grain sorghum) will come in 50 Pound Bags and will cost about $5-$7 a bag. One thing to remember about making purchases from a Feed Store is that all of these items will be cheaper in the country than they will in the city. If you go to a feed store in a major metropolitan city they typically charge 25% or more higher prices than the feed stores in the country or in areas that sell high volumes of feed do.

Wheat is the next option. Wheat (most commonly called cracked wheat in feed stores). Wheat is available in 50 Lb bags and will cost anywhere from $5-$7 per bag. It is pretty self explanatory as to what it is so I will not go into it. Wheat does seem to be very regional in nature as well and I have again received many reports outside of Texas that wheat is not available. I cannot understand why and truly believe that this has more to do with ignorance on behalf of the feed store owners.

The final consideration is Hen Scratch. Hen scratch is typically available all across the United States. Hen Scratch is used to feed chickens and contains a blend of corn, milo and wheat.

Now you’re probably asking, with all of these choices what should I use for my catfish chum? Well, you have to make your own decision as to whether or not you can handle the smell of soured grain, and assess your options available to you locally.

If your fishing with North Texas Catfish Guide Service on one of our guided catfish fishing trips for channel catfish, and we are using soured grain for catfish chum or fishing a baited hole, we will typically use cottonseed cakes if they are available (or range cubes if not) and soured wheat for chumming for catfish.

If cottonseed cakes are not available, range cubes are an effective option. They range cubes are definitely not as effective as cottonseed cakes, but they are indeed effective. Wheat is our primary choice for soured grains on our guided catfish fishing trips, but if wheat is not available, milo is a close runner for second place as an effective catfish chum. Hen scratch would be my very last choice for catfish chum on our catfish guide trips because it contains corn, which takes longer to ferment and fills the fish up faster..

Now again, this (chumming for catfish or “baiting a hole”) is not something we do on a regular basis, and it is typically isolated to certain lakes we fish on our guided catfish fishing trips, and certain time of the year. Our preference is to fish for blue catfish with fresh caught bait on our guided catfish fishing trips. Like we said, if your after huge catfish, or blue catfish, this is not an effective way to catch catfish, but if you wanting to catch some channel catfish and a few blue catfish mixed in here and there, then chumming or baiting a hole is a good option.

If your using the range cubes or cottonseed cakes there is no preparation involved, but if your using the milo, wheat or hen scratch then there will be some preparation involved in getting your catfish chum ready.

The first step is going to be to get several (three or four) plastic 5 gallon buckets. These can be obtained just about anywhere, and you will need lids for these 5 gallon buckets, and preferably lids that snap on tight and seal the bucket of catfish chum very well.

Take your plastic buckets (make sure they are clean) and set them out. Take your bag of grain (milo, wheat or hen scratch) and fill each of your plastic buckets a little less than three quarters of the way full with grain.

Once you have filled the buckets with grain, then you should fill them with water within about two to three inches of the top of the bucket. You want to make sure you add plenty of water because the grain will begin to absorb water very quickly. After adding the grain and water for your catfish chum, you will want to pour in about ½ of a 12 ounce can of beer and a few tablespoons of sugar. This will help jump start the fermentation process of your catfish chum and get it ready a little more quickly.

When all of your ingredients in your catfish chum have been added, then you should place the lids on the tops of the buckets. DO NOT snap the lids on or seal them, because when the fermentation begins, the grains will put off gases. The gas needs to be able to escape, or otherwise your bucket will blow up, and blow soured grain catfish chum all over everything around it. Leave the lid loose on the buckets for several days until the soured grain catfish chum stops bubbling.

You will need to check on the grain every few days and add water to it as needed as the grain absorbs the water. Once the rain has absorbed the water initially then you simply need to keep the water one to two inches above the top of the grain.

In Texas during the Summer when it is 100 degrees outside the grain will be fermented and ready to use as catfish chum in just a few days. If your making your catfish chum during the cooler months, you should allow one to two weeks for the grain to ferment.

You will be able to tell that your catfish chum is done fermenting and is ready to use several ways. It will quit absorbing water. It will quit “bubbling”. It will also no longer float (if you try to use it too early the soured grain will float.)

Most people will sour grain in a 5 gallon plastic bucket with a snap on lid so when the grain has finished fermenting they can snap the lid in the bucket of catfish chum and seal in the smell as much as possible. If your doing a lot of fishing and using a lot of soured grain catfish chum you should consider souring your wheat or milo in a 55 gallon drum or trash can and adding grain as necessary. Just make sure that the top is covered because failing to do so will cause maggots to grow in your catfish chum.

Another thing to consider about using your soured grain catfish chum is when you get to the end of the bucket, leave an inch or two of the fermented grain in the bottom of the bucket. This will “jump start” the next batch of grain that you sour and will allow it to ferment much more quickly.

Now, on to chumming for catfish or baiting a hole.

Chumming and Baiting a Hole are actually two very different things. Chumming for catfish is the practice of throwing out soured grain, range cubes, cottonseed cake or whatever your choice is of catfish chum, right before or a short time before you start fishing for catfish. Baiting a Hole is typically considered a more long term endeavor where you choose a location and chum the area for catfish with your soured grain or range cubes on a regularly scheduled basis to draw the catfish into the area and keep them in the area.

There is no doubt that “baiting a hole” is beneficial if your someone who will be fishing for channel catfish on a regular basis. For the purpose of this article, the process of throwing the grain or range cubes out stays the same. The only difference is if you were baiting a hole or chumming an area on a regular basis you would go to the exact same area and throw out your soured grain catfish chum or range cubes several times a week or more.

Many lakes in Texas have areas that are “community” fishing holes that are constantly baited with soured grain or range cubes on a regular basis by the anglers who fish these areas which keeps the channel catfish in the area all the time. These areas are typically marked with large landmarks like bulkheads or bridges, or they are in areas where anglers have set some sort of permanent buoy marker in the area and everyone throws soured grain or range cubes in the area when they fish.

So the first thing you need to consider about chumming for catfish or baiting a hole for catfish with soured grain is transporting the soured grain catfish chum to the lake or river. You have not lived until you have had a bucket of stinking rotten soured grain catfish chum turn over and spill in your boat or truck. I can speak from experience that it is not something that you want to go through.

The best mode of transportation and storage I have found is a 3 Gallon Plastic Bucket. These can be purchased at a home supply store with a lid for a few dollars. Go ahead and shell out the $3 for a new bucket so you will be assured the lid has a good seal on it and won’t leak. The 3 gallon bucket takes up less room in a boat and also cuts down on weight in the boat as well. You are not likely to need 5 gallons of soured grain in a single day or nights catfish fishing trip. Again when you put the grain in the 3 gallon bucket to transport to the lake or river, MAKE SURE THE LID IS SEALED AND THE BUCKET IS SECURE.

Once you get to the lake you need to determine where your going to fish for catfish. I will not divulge specific locations or areas you should look for but I can tell you that from my experience I have found chumming for catfish or baiting a hole for catfish to be most effective in shallower water. I would not consider chumming for catfish or baiting a hole for catfish in water over about 20 feet deep, and even that would be really deep for my typical style of fishing for channel catfish.

Get to your area that you have determined that you will be fishing for channel catfish and open up your bucket of soured grain catfish chum or your range cubes. If your using range cubes you can throw them around by hand, but if using soured grain you will want to use a scoop, coffee can or something to that effect to keep the grain off your hand. I prefer a plastic dog food scoop for the soured grain because I can scoop the grain out of the bucket without getting the grain on my hands.

You want to throw out about ¼ gallon of soured grain if using soured grain for your catfish chum. If using range cubes then 4-5 large handfuls of range cubes will work. Just remember, all your trying to do is “fire up” the catfish bite and concentrate the catfish into an area. If you use too much catfish chum you will simply feed the catfish and they will not be interested in your offerings.

When you throw out the soured grain or range cubes, don’t just toss them over the side of the boat. You want to throw your catfish chum out in a fashion that would be similar to feeding chickens. Spread the catfish chum out over the area and make the channel catfish work for it to look for it. The whole idea is to draw them in with the scent and keep them on the move.

Typically channel catfish anglers will “chum” several areas for channel catfish when they get on the water. Picking four or five areas to throw their catfish chum. These areas may often be 100 yards apart of less but having several areas definitely increases your odds of catching more catfish.

When you chum your area, you want to make particular note of where you have thrown your catfish chum, either by using a landmark, marking it with a buoy, marking it on GPS, or working from memory. The problem with using landmarks or working from memory is when you start fishing for catfish, you want to make sure you fish in the exact area that you threw your grain, and after it gets dark or you have chummed several different areas for channel catfish, they all begin to run together and look the same. Marker buoy’s work great, but they also broadcast to everyone else out there that is a fishing area. My preferred method for marking areas on my guided catfish fishing trips is to mark the area with a GPS unit that way I have accurate information on my catfish fishing area and know I am in the right place.

Use your catfish chum in several different areas and mark each one. Go back to the first areas where you have thrown your catfish chum, anchor back away from it and start fishing. Typically your catfish chum will draw in channel catfish in a very short period of time. I have had the catfish chum be effective in as short as a few minutes, and have also had it take as long as thirty minutes as well.

When you chum for catfish, it is a good idea to target different depths and different structure and cover so you can cover several different areas for your chumming and increase your chances of catching more channel catfish.

As a general rule, I will not fish an area for more than 10 minutes without getting bites, which is probably a little less time than most people will allow, but on my guided catfish fishing trips I want to make sure my customers catch catfish so I eliminate as much of the “sit and wait”: as possible. I would never sit in an area for longer than 30 minutes without a bite.

Once you have fished the first area where you have thrown your catfish chum, if you don’t get bites or catch catfish, throw out some more of your soured grain catfish chum or range cubes catfish chum and move to your second spot. You can come back to the area and fish again later if needed. If you do start catching catfish then keep fishing until the bite slows down. When the bite slows down, throw out a small amount of more soured grain and keep fishing until the catfish stop biting. When they stop biting, throw out some more grain and move, you may be able to come back to this area later.

Once you have fished all of your areas, you can work your way back through the areas you have chummed for catfish and fish them again if needed, but you very well may have a limit of catfish the first time around.

Now that you know how to prepare your catfish chum, how to chum for catfish, how to bait a hole for catfish, and the different areas that you should use your catfish chum, you should pretty much know all there is to know about chumming for catfish.

The next step is to consider your equipment for catfishing and your catfish bait for catching channel catfish.

Fishing equipment for catching channel catfish as a general rule is much different than the equipment we use for catching blue catfish and trophy blue catfish on our guided catfish fishing trips. Channel catfish will generally average 1-3 pounds in size so the tackle and equipment can be much lighter, plus the channel catfish bite is much lighter than that of a blue catfish. When a blue catfish hits there is no doubt about it, but channel catfish are often described as “mealy mouthing” the catfish bait or sucking on it and playing with it, often without the knowledge of the person holding the fishing rod.

Let’s start with catfish bait for fishing in chummed areas for channel catfish. I can say hands down without a doubt the absolute best bait for fishing in chummed areas or a grained hole is Sure Shot Catfish Punch Bait.

Catfish Baits and very regional in nature and “Punch Bait” seems to be a term that is regional to Texas and Oklahoma. The difference between a “punch bait” and a dip bait is very simple. Dip baits, which are common throughout the United States for channel catfish, are very runny and require a sponge or dip worm to keep the catfish bait on the hook.

Dip baits are an effective catfish bait for man catfish anglers but I find them to be messy and difficult to fish with. Having to use sponges, dip worms and other items to keep the catfish bait on the hook, plus the fact that the bait does not stay on the dip worm or sponge for more than a couple of minutes, makes these dip baits far to difficult in my opinion.

Catfish Punch Baits are much thicker than dip baits and will stick on a plain treble hook, and do not require a dip worm or sponge to keep the catfish bait on the hook. These “punch baits” get their name because you take the treble hook and “punch” the hook into the bait with a stick and then pull the treble hook out by the fishing line and the bait sticks on the hook.

Punch baits, just like dip baits are primarily made of cheese. There are many of these baits on the market, some are good, and some are not. I cannot attest to the effectiveness of many of them, because there are only a handful that I use, but the one catfish punch bait that I do use and has always produced consistent results for channel catfish on our guided catfish fishing trips has been Sure Shot Catfish Punch Bait.

Sure Shot Catfish Punch bait is a homemade catfish punch bait made in Decatur Texas by my good friend Benny Roberts. Benny’s Sure Shot Catfish Punch Bait is made from cheese and various other secret ingredients. It is simple to use and will flat out catch catfish.

Catfish Punch Baits can be fished with a treble hook on a slip sinker rig or underneath a slip cork either one. This is simply a matter of personal preference as to which you choose.

If you’re out to catch a nice mess of channel catfish, then chumming for catfish or baiting a hole for catfish would be a good option for you to explore.

More information on chumming for catfish, baiting a hole for catfish and making catfish chum can be found on the Learn To Catch Catfish website.

Take the tools and information that we have given you and give it a try on your next catfish fishing trip, or if you want to see firsthand how to catch catfish, contact North Texas Catfish Guide Service at 817-522-3804 for a guided catfishing trip on Eagle Mountain LakeLake LewisvilleLake Worth or one of the other lakes we fish.

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Texas Trophy Blue Catfish (Texas Parks and Wildlife) http://www.txcatfishguide.com/texas-trophy-blue-catfish-tpw/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/texas-trophy-blue-catfish-tpw/#respond Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:29:12 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1410 Fishing for Texas Trophy Blue Catfish Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine November 2005 Big Blues – Big Blue Catfish A new breed of trophy hunter focuses on the blue catfish favorite snack food. By Paul A. Cañada When TPWD biologist Bruce Hysmith used to fish off of Lake Texoma’s Roosevelt Bridge as a boy, he...

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Fishing for Texas Trophy Blue Catfish

Texas Parks and Wildlife Magazine November 2005

Big Blues – Big Blue Catfish

A new breed of trophy hunter focuses on the blue catfish favorite snack food.

By Paul A. Cañada

When TPWD biologist Bruce Hysmith used to fish off of Lake Texoma’s Roosevelt Bridge as a boy, he was usually in search of white bass. But he always heard stories of something larger looming just out of sight.

“Our parents told us about giant catfish lurking in the water below that bridge,” says Hysmith. “Of course, those stories were most likely contrived by the adults in hopes of scaring us from leaning over the guardrail. Still, they had us kids believing that if we fell in, we would be eaten by fish as big as cars.”

Throughout the years, the impressive size, raw power and long lifespan of blue catfish have fueled the imaginations of Texas anglers. In January of 2004, the folklore became reality when Cody Mullennix of Howe, Texas landed an enormous blue catfish from Lake Texoma. The large predator tipped the scales at 121.5 pounds. The fish was a new Texas state record. For a short while, until a 124-pound blue was caught from the Mississippi River in Illinois, Mullennix’s fish stood as the International Game Fish Association world record.

It often takes decades for a blue catfish to reach trophy size. In fact, some blue cats are older than the angler on the other end of the line. According to Hysmith, the estimated age of the 121.5-pound state record blue catfish is between 27 and 30 years old.

“Any cold-blooded animal has what we biologists term as indeterminate growth,” says Hysmith. “They will continue to grow on and on, unless one of three things — food source, senility or environmental conditions — limit or control that growth. Under the right conditions, these blue catfish will grow to tremendous sizes.”

While most catfish anglers still rely on traditional means — jug lines, trot lines and limb lines — when targeting the bigger cats, a new breed of catfish angler has arrived on the scene today. These anglers actively hunt the big blue cats found in Texas’ large, relatively deep reservoirs. Using electronics and special techniques, they chase after the largest predator found in their impoundments.

The new breed of trophy hunter focuses on the blue cat’s fondness for shad. Many members of this select group of anglers are former striped bass anglers whose first contact with blues 30 pounds and larger occurred while fishing for giant stripers, under schools of shad, in open water. The trophy blue’s tendency to move with schools of baitfish often makes the highly sought predator a tough cat to catch. Few understand the blue catfish and its habitat like guides Chad Ferguson and Randle Hall.

Trophy-sized Fish are Structure-oriented

Throughout Ferguson’s angling career he has studied and pursued many species, including striped bass, black bass and catfish. The longtime guide believes, as with stripers and black bass, the location and activity of blue catfish correspond with the seasonal movements of large schools of threadfin shad and baitfish

As soon as water temperatures drop into the 60s and the reservoir’s water level stabilizes, baitfish begin congregating in large schools and moving towards deep water. Depending on geography, this period can occur as early as October in North Texas and as late as December in South Texas. According to Ferguson, this phase of colder water temperatures and large schools of baitfish begins the ideal season for catching trophy-sized blue catfish.

“While I do catch big blues year round,” says Ferguson, “I don’t start concentrating my efforts on trophy-sized fish until that cold-water period. I simply don’t see the numbers of big fish, like I catch in late fall and early winter, during any other season. I’ll have days where I am likely to catch more than a dozen fish over 25 pounds.”

On many of Texas’ larger impoundments, these schools of bait relate chiefly to main-lake structural features, such as flats, roadbeds, berms, points and humps. The blue catfish use the same structure to intercept shad and other fish moving out of creeks and coves, and back out to the deep water of the main lake.

Ferguson targets main lake structure, adjacent to deep water or a channel, when looking for the biggest blues. The water depth over most of the structure he targets ranges between 25 and 45 feet. Using his electronics, the catfish guide first looks for the schools of shad, roaming the flats. Typically, the shad are spread throughout the water column.

The ideal location for finding the larger catfish is a hump or point created by the intersection of two channels. The change in water depth between the channel and structural feature may be as subtle as 5 feet. However, when a school of baitfish is holding over or near the structure, the biggest blues will normally be found nearby, along that channel edge.

“The blue catfish suspend or park themselves underneath the baitfish,” notes Ferguson. “In most cases the catfish will be near the bottom. However, there are times when the fish are suspended off the bottom, just below the baitfish.”

According to Ferguson, anglers trained at using onboard electronics normally have no problem locating the big predators below the school. The profile of a trophy-sized blue cat on a depth finder is unique from other predators. Unlike the classic inverted-V of a striped bass or largemouth, the profile of a larger blue is more round and resembles an umbrella.

“I rely on my depth finder nearly 100 percent of the time to locate these fish,” says Ferguson. “However, they don’t always show up as an umbrella-shaped arch on the depth finder screen when moving, or holding tight to the bottom. It takes some practice and experience to find them under those conditions.”

Like Ferguson, Randle Hall has devoted many years to the study and pursuit of Texas’ largest freshwater predators. Hall’s studies and fish-catching ability brought him national recognition as a top guide and trophy catfish hunter. In fact, Hall’s clients have set the last six Lake Lewisville water body records, including the current 63.12-pound catfish. Today, Hall is an offshore saltwater guide working out of Port Mansfield. However, he still returns to his old stomping grounds, Lake Texoma and Lake Lewisville, to chase the blue catfish.

According to Hall, it’s not unusual to find what seems to be the perfect structural edge, or break, and not find the big cats. However, find schools of shad near that edge and you almost always find big blues underneath them.

“The baitfish is the key,” explains Hall. “You have got to take a look at the entire ecosystem. The plankton determines where the shad will be, and the shad determine where the big blues are going to be found.”

Like Ferguson, Hall looks for secondary features intercepting a main channel. According to Hall, the biggest predators hold off of ditches, drains or tributary creek channels during the day. At night, the big fish use the structure to travel up on to the shallower flat.

Attention-getting Presentations

As noted before, active blue cats are typically found suspended under a school of baitfish. Hall prefers to drift cut-bait when targeting suspended fish. His first drift presentation utilizes a Carolina rig with a crappie float, 6 to 8 inches above the hook, which lifts the cut-bait and leader off the bottom. The length of the rig’s 50-pound test leader varies, depending on how far off the bottom the fish are suspended, between four and 10 feet.

Whether the fish are suspended or near the bottom, Hall believes it’s important to keep the bait off the bottom.

“I try to get the bait at least 18 to 24 inches off the bottom,” he says. “By keeping that bait off the bottom, I am making it easier for the catfish to take the bait.”

Hall uses cut pieces of shad or carp under a balloon — a traditional striped bass rig — when the catfish are suspended over deeper water. He prefers a slightly inflated balloon attached to a sliding snap-swivel, stopped by a glass bead and a float-stop. The float-stop is placed 10 to 12 feet above the bait. The balloon acts as slip float, casting fairly easily and then sliding up the line to the float-stop and resting on the surface.

Hall pays great attention to detail when setting up a drift. He specifically targets deep-water breaks, aligned with the prevailing wind. Hall then spreads four to six lines out behind the boat. He’s able to regulate the speed of his drift by matching the size of his sea anchor, ranging between 54 and 106 inches, to the wind speed.

“Presentation is everything when using a drift technique,” warned Hall. “The speed of your drift is critically important. In summer, the biggest fish are spread out but are very aggressive, and so you can drift faster. In fall, when the big catfish are congregated in small groups, it’s sometimes important to drift as slow as possible.”

Ferguson also uses drift presentations, but when given a choice, he prefers anchoring, casting and slowly dragging a presentation back to the boat. He relies primarily on two presentations when anchored. His bread-and-butter rig is the traditional Carolina rig, with a three- or four-foot leader and a three-ounce, egg-shaped sinker.

The North Texas guide’s second-most-utilized rig is what locals call a “Santee-Cooper rig.” The rig utilizes an in-line cork, located halfway down the leader. Similar to Hall’s cork rig, the Santee-Cooper rig keeps the bait off the bottom.

“I start with a presentation that best matches the conditions at hand, and then pay close attention to how the fish react to it,” says Ferguson. “I will change rigs or modify the rig to adjust to the fish. The big fish bite changes from day to day. They may be aggressive one day and more selective the next.”

No matter how the large blue cat approaches and takes the bait, the ensuing battle is bound to be memorable. Still, each fish is an individual. While some fight hard immediately after the hook set, others come right to the boat, convincing the angler that a smaller fish is on the line. However, the angler is quickly enlightened when the big cat’s fierceness is unleashed at boat-side.

“The majority of the trophy-sized fish, 25 pounds or larger, surface a great distance from the boat,” says Hall. “They roll and slap the surface, spraying water 15 to 20 feet in the air. It’s a thrill to see a big fish do that because, until the fish surfaces, you don’t really know how big it is.

“I remember a time out on Lake Texoma when a big blue pulled my 25-foot Boston Whaler backwards. That’s the kind of strength these fish have. All you can do is hold on to your rod and hope for the best.”

 

Trophy Blue Cat Fisheries

Texas is blessed with dozens of fisheries supporting trophy-sized blue catfish. Nearly 50 fisheries have water body records of more than 40 pounds, and 20 fisheries have records of more than 60 pounds. In fact, five reservoirs — Conroe, Sam Rayburn, Lake Fork, Gibbons Creek and Lake Texoma — have water body records exceeding 80 pounds.

The majority of the reservoirs with record fish over 60 pounds have a few things in common. First, they all have healthy populations of prey fish, such as threadfin and gizzard shad. Second, nearly all of these reservoirs have plenty of habitats, adjacent to deep water. Finally, many of these impoundments have impressive striped and white bass populations.

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department district biologist Bruce Hysmith quickly dismisses the notion that blue catfish only grow large in large impoundments.

“Typically, you think of blue catfish as big-water fish,” says Hysmith. “You think of Lake Livingston or Lake Texoma when considering the best place to find trophy-sized blues. However, Lake Bonham is about 1,020 acres and it has a great blue catfish population. Similarly, Lake Nacoma is another relatively small reservoir with an outstanding blue catfish population.

“Many of our fisheries in Texas support good blue catfish populations. It’s not impractical to think that there are 60- to 75-pound fish swimming in most of our reservoirs.”

North Texans have a good number of trophy fisheries to choose from, including Cooper, Fork, Lavon, Lewisville, Tawakoni and Texoma. Likewise, anglers living in East Texas also have a variety of fisheries to try, including Conroe, Gibbons Creek, Livingston, Toledo Bend and Sam Rayburn. Fishing for blue catfish is good on many central Texas impoundments, including Belton, Buchanan, Fayette County, Travis and Whitney.

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Keep An Open Mind In Pursuit Of Big Catfish http://www.txcatfishguide.com/pursuit-big-catfish-dmn/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/pursuit-big-catfish-dmn/#respond Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:26:05 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1404 Keep an open mind in pursuit of big catfish Winter is whopper time, and there are lots of ways to land them 11:40 PM CST on Saturday, February 19, 2005 By RAY SASSER / The Dallas Morning News According to popular lore, there’s more than one way to skin a cat. More than one way to...

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Keep an open mind in pursuit of big catfish

Winter is whopper time, and there are lots of ways to land them

11:40 PM CST on Saturday, February 19, 2005 By RAY SASSER / The Dallas Morning News

According to popular lore, there’s more than one way to skin a cat. More than one way to catch a cat, too, say Dallas-area catfish pros. The winter season is big fish time for oversized blue cats – fish that weigh 30 pounds or more.

In fact, Chad Ferguson hated to see the February warm-up that delighted most North Texas residents. Ferguson runs North Texas Catfish Guide Service and fishes on six lakes in the area. Ferguson endured his worst fishing day of the season last Sunday.

“During cold weather, the shad stay concentrated in deeper water, and the fish are right there with them,” Ferguson said. “When the weather warms, the baitfish and the catfish scatter.”

When conditions are right, Ferguson puts his clients on 25 to 30 fish a day, and virtually every customer can expect to catch a blue catfish 25 pounds or more. Just don’t expect to eat the big catfish. Ferguson is one the new breed of catfish pros who practice catch-and-release for big fish.

“My rule is that we release all catfish weighing 10 pounds or more,” Ferguson said. “That rule has cost me some business, but it takes a long time to grow a big fish, and they’re too valuable to eat. The small catfish are better for eating, anyway.”

Ferguson uses sonar to spot schools of shad near submerged structure, then fishes around the baitfish. He uses shad or cut bait.

“I target blue cats, because they grow bigger and fight harder than channel cats,” he said. “The biggest fish caught from my boat this year has been 44 pounds.”

While Ferguson targets blue cats in deep water, Larry Spillers of Quinlan sticks with the shallows. Spillers and fishing partner Danny King compete in ACATS (American Catfish Anglers Tournament Series) tournaments such as the one scheduled for Lake Tawakoni on Saturday.

“I seem to catch more and bigger fish in water 12 feet deep or less,” Spillers said. “I fish a lot in coves that have creeks and channels coming into them, but I fish in the shallow flats rather than the deep channels.”

Spillers relies on a catfish bait marketed by his fishing partner. He fishes it with a Carolina-style bass-fishing setup that usually features a slip sinker above a barrel swivel. Like bass anglers, he sometimes uses plastic beads on the rig to create a “clicking” sound that attracts fish. It takes a treble hook to hold the soft “punch bait” made by King. Spillers’ biggest blue cat weighed 48 pounds and was caught at Richland Chambers Lake.

“There’s a lot more information available now to make people better at catching catfish,” said Spillers. “The main thing I tell fishermen is to stay versatile. Some guys still fish the way their grandfathers showed them, and they catch fish using the old techniques. We’re finding out that you can catch catfish in lots of different ways.”

While catfish are the undisputed heavyweights of North Texas game fish, some anglers would rather have constant action on smaller fish than fish for hours hoping for a big one. Howard Carry targets channel catfish at Lake Tawakoni and seldom comes home empty-handed. The fish Carry catches rarely weigh more than 5 pounds, but he makes up for size with sheer numbers. In fact, 99 percent of the people who fish with Carry fill their 25-fish limits, often in a couple of hours.

Carry’s secret is keeping key spots baited with soured corn chops or maize. He keeps four 40-gallon barrels of the pungent grain in different stages of fermentation. When Carry has a morning fishing trip planned, he makes the rounds of a few productive spots the afternoon before, pouring soured grain into the water. Catfish have a notoriously good sense of smell, and odor emanating from the grain draws fish from all around, concentrating them in Carry’s fishing spots. The next morning, Carry adds a little more grain to the water or puts in a few range cubes, which are designed for feeding cattle.

“The range cubes really gets ‘em going,” Carry said. “I like to bait spots in flooded woods near a river or creek channel. The fishing stays very good through April.”

Spillers teaches catfishing seminars and believes tournament fishing is a good forum for catfishing techniques. Ferguson sees the Internet as a cyberspeed connection to a traditional sport. “I’m seeing a lot more information about catfish on the fishing forums,” he said.

 

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Airboat Trophy Blue Catfish and More http://www.txcatfishguide.com/airboat-trophy-blue-catfish/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/airboat-trophy-blue-catfish/#respond Sat, 12 Oct 2013 00:31:13 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1120 I’m still working on getting information updated on the site but I wanted to get some information posted as soon as possible. I am pleased to announce that my good friend Robert Horton has joined the North Texas Catfish Guide Service team and will be running trophy catfish trips on the rivers in north Texas...

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North Texas Catfish Guide Airboat Trips

I’m still working on getting information updated on the site but I wanted to get some information posted as soon as possible.

I am pleased to announce that my good friend Robert Horton has joined the North Texas Catfish Guide Service team and will be running trophy catfish trips on the rivers in north Texas starting immediately.

Robert and I have been friends for several years and he’s a perfect fit for North Texas Catfish Guide Service team. You’d be hard pressed to find a more well rounded and avid outdoorsman.

If it has something to do with catching, hunting or killing you can bet he has had his hand in it in some way or knows something about it. Outside of being a well rounded outdoorsman he’s a real catfish catching dude and has the big trophy blue catfish pinned up in the rivers!

Combine his skills and ability to find catfish with one of the most impressive airboats you’ll ever see and you have a dream catfish fishing trip.

A trophy catfish trip on Robert Horton’s airboat is something you have to do at least once in your lifetime!

The experience of running down the river in the decked out 20′ Air Ranger Airboat alone is a once in a lifetime experience but couple that with the blue catfish you’ll catch that nobody else can get to and you’ve got the experience of a lifetime.

Hop on board the 20 foot Air Ranger airboat and go on a river run in areas that rarely see humans and catch monster blue catfish with North Texas Catfish Guide Service.

River trips are focused on catching monster blue catfish and are all catch and release. No fish will be kept of any size.

Trips are available on the Red River as will as several other undisclosed locations in North Texas. Launch locations are all a short drive from the DFW metroplex.

We’ll be adding more details and information to the main website in coming weeks. In the meantime feel free to give us a shout at 817-522-3804 for more information or to book your river trip for trophy blue catfish.

Be on the lookout for pictures, and more details on these guided catfish trips on the Texas rivers.

More Changes To North Texas Catfish Guide Service

Robert Horton joining the North Texas Catfish Guide Service team is the first of several changes I’m making. There will be several more announcements in the coming months.

Despite rumors, I am still guiding and will continue to do so, I’m just making some changes, bringing on some additional help not only on the water but in the office as well. Over the next few months I’m taking some extra time to focus on several things that need to be ready for spring 2014 but other than that it is business as usual.

I’m focusing on the business and streamlining processes. Over the past thirteen years I’ve run the guide business the same way from day one and never put much thought into how everything works and how cumbersome it is not only on me and trying to manage the day to day business and bookings but but on you, the customer.

We’re working on streamlining everything to make reservation inquiries, booking and paying deposits easier to getting instructions and information to you before the trip.

Over time I’ve continued to run the guide business, take customers fishing and manage all aspects of the business from reservations to booking and everything in between.

When you add the responsibilities that come along with managing Learn To Catch Catfish and Catfish Edge  and growing commitments with writing and photography for magazines it’s put me in a situation where I can’t even think straight (and I screw a lot of stuff up).

As we streamline booking/payments and make changes to the way we do business you may communicate with some people you have not spoken with before (primarily my wife Leanne). If you need to speak with me at any time feel free to call or email and I will get right back with you!

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Catfish Edge – The Cutting Edge Of Catfishing http://www.txcatfishguide.com/catfish-edge-update/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/catfish-edge-update/#respond Fri, 11 Oct 2013 04:39:34 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1117 In 2009 I started the Learn To Catch Catfish website to have a place to share information, techniques and other catfish fishing information with anglers. I started Learn To Catch Catfish on a whim and had no idea when it started that it would grow to what it has become today. Over the last few...

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Catfish Edge - The Cutting Edge Of Catfish Fishing

In 2009 I started the Learn To Catch Catfish website to have a place to share information, techniques and other catfish fishing information with anglers. I started Learn To Catch Catfish on a whim and had no idea when it started that it would grow to what it has become today.

Over the last few years I’ve developed a lot of relationships through this site with magazines, tackle companies and a variety of other people in the fishing industry.

The rapid growth of the website has created a number of issues. Keeping up with the servers and web traffic has been a nearly impossible and the servers that host our site have are constantly taxed. This combined with a bubble gum and bailing wire system that was pieced together to make it all work has created more issues.

Through this time I’ve been doing a number of things outside of the normal business of being a fishing guide. This includes everything from the books on locating and catching catfish to writing and photography for a variety of magazines. I’ve had a number of articles and photos published this year in some of the top fishing magazines in the industry.

Working with magazines, tackle companies and other catfish anglers, guides and tournament fishermen has allowed me to gain some perspective that I would not have had otherwise.

For the past year or so I’ve had an idea that I just couldn’t shake and a vision for a bigger venture.

Several weeks ago I released the name for this new venture, Catfish Edge. It’s a basic shell of a website with a logo right now and the majority of activity has been on the Catfish Edge Facebook page and on Twitter.

In the coming weeks and months I’ll be releasing more information about Catfish Edge, what it means and where it’s headed. There are some big things in the works but I’m slowly taking the time to make sure it’s done right.

If you’re hear because you want to take a charter fishing trip and go have some fun then Catfish Edge probably won’t be of much interest to you.

If you’re here because your’e a catfish angler or are working to learn to pattern and catch catfish then Catfish Edge will be a great fit and something you should check out. Be sure to head over to the Catfish Edge website and check sign up for the mailing list so you can stay updated!

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Eagle Mountain Lake Fishing October 10, 2013 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/eagle-mountain-lake-fishing-101013/ http://www.txcatfishguide.com/eagle-mountain-lake-fishing-101013/#respond Fri, 11 Oct 2013 03:47:09 +0000 http://www.txcatfishguide.com/?p=1111 It’s been a long while since I’ve posted a fishing report. The last few months have been a whirlwind. I had (unexpectedly) had surgery a few weeks ago and was laid up for a few weeks but have finally gotten my feet back on the ground (or boat I guess I should say) and wanted...

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It’s been a long while since I’ve posted a fishing report. The last few months have been a whirlwind.

I had (unexpectedly) had surgery a few weeks ago and was laid up for a few weeks but have finally gotten my feet back on the ground (or boat I guess I should say) and wanted to provide an update on the fishing few things.

Are The Catfish Biting On Eagle Mountain Lake?

I’ve taken a dozen calls the past few days with people wanting to know if the catfish are biting. It’s October and the fishing in October is always like hot and cold running water for catfish on all of the North Texas lakes and that’s even more true for Eagle Mountain Lake. With the changing weather and cooling water temperatures the fishing will be great one day and then they scatter again so you just never know what you’re going to get.

This is typical for October and happens every year. How long this will last really depends on the weather and how quickly the water cools. The more hot and cold weather we have the longer it lasts.

It’s cool enough now that I’m ready to start scouting for trophy blues.

The trophy blue catfish bite will fire up and get good the more the water cools. The colder it gets the better the bite is.

Generally the best trophy blue cat bite runs from Thanksgiving until late February when the water warms. Every once in a while we get  a bonus year where the water stays cool and the excellent big fish bite lasts longer (like last year).

I’ll be doing trophy blue catfish trips on Lake Worth and will run some on Eagle Mountain Lake as well. We caught some excellent trophy blue catfish on Eagle Mountain in 2012 and all indications are that it will only get better from here.

I’ve got some other big announcements that I’ll be posting about some additions and changes to North Texas Catfish Guide Service as well as some other related new. Be sure to check them out here.

North Texas Catfish Guide Service

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